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Richard III

At Oxford Playhouse

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An inventive new production of Shakespeare’s Richard III comes to Oxford Playhouse from Tuesday 7 to Saturday 11 May.

John Haidar directs Tom Mothersdale as Shakespeare’s most notorious and complex villain. This imaginative new staging is a co-production between Headlong, Alexandra Palace and Bristol Old Vic, in association with Royal & Derngate Northampton and Oxford Playhouse, and is the final Oxford Playhouse co- production in celebration of the theatre’s 80th year.

‘What do I fear? Myself?’ After decades of civil war, the nation hangs in the balance. Enter Richard, Duke of Gloucester, to change the course of history. Richard was not born to be a king, but he’s set his sights on the crown. So begins his campaign of deceit, manipulation and violence – and he’s killing it. Yet, behind his ambition lies a murderous desire to be loved.

Laura Elliot, Programme Director at Oxford Playhouse said: ‘We are delighted to be associate producers on what we know will be an exhilarating new version of Richard III with a stunning cast and creative team. Headlong have over a 40 year history with Oxford Playhouse, following their roots as Oxford Stage Company and we are thrilled to be partnering with them again as part of our theatre’s 80th birthday celebrations, with renowned peers from around the country.’

Stefan Adegbola, Derbhle Crotty, Heledd Gwynn, Tom Kanji, Michael Matus, Leila Mimmack, Eileen Nicholas, Caleb Roberts and John Sackville join Tom Mothersdale in what promises to be a deeply engaging production.

Tickets for Richard III at Oxford Playhouse start at £10 and are available from the Ticket Office on 01865 305305 or book online at www.oxfordplayhouse.com

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