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OX Loves

OXLoves
Music at Oxford
The Ashmolean Museum
Kelmscott Manor
The George Hotel Wallingford
Cornerstone Arts Centre
Malmaison
Graven Hill
Beachborough School
Oxford Ironmongery
Bicester Hotel Golf and Spa
Donnington Grove Country Club
David Goode Bronze Sculpture
Eynsham Park Sawmill
Five Arrows Hotel
John Nicholls
The Real Wood Furniture Company
Stoke Park
Susan Dunstall Garden Design
The Bodleian Libraries
The Dairy at Waddesdon Manor
The Hexagon
The Perch Free House
Macdonald Randolph Hotel
Tythe Barn
Jericho Kitchen
Olivia May
Woodwise Kitchens
Cokethorpe School
The Mill Arts Centre
Sahara
Mosaics
Manor House Stoves
The Maytime Inn
Elm of Burford
Pegasus Theatre
St Teresa's School
Oakley Wood Timber
Clarendon
Henley Greenlands Conferences
Woburn Abbey
Added Ingredients, Abingdon
Vets4Pets
Oxford Floatation Centre
Johnsons Cars Oxford
Great Western Park
Fri 18 Jan 2019

Foodylicious:

Food and Drink you can feel Good About

After a chance meeting at the Didcot Street Fair I find myself on the way to meet Simon Collison, a man who knows more about the UK’s food and drink industry than anyone you’re likely to meet. I was there to discover the ethos of a man whose enterprise, Foodylicious, had caught our attention. He’s an extremely affable chap, with a generous smile and genuinely enthusiastic tone. I first ask him of the route of his career thus far and discover a raft of leading brands that he was responsible for bringing to the UK consumer.

Thu 17 Jan 2019

Graven Hill:

Open the door to custom build new homes 

Graven Hill, one of the country’s most innovative self-build and custom build villages, is holding its first ‘Hard Hat’ event of 2019 on 26 January. The event will give visitors the chance to view the custom build new homes that are currently under construction and look around the site to get a feel for how their ideas could be translated into bricks and mortar. Sensible shoes will be a must! 

Thu 17 Jan 2019

Cotswold Stone:

Millennia in the Making 

The Cotswolds sit atop this pre-historic legacy, as though a lush green velvet shawl has been draped across the hunched shoulders of a rocky frame. Cleaved from the ground and its antediluvian origin, it is this material that gives the area its ineffable quality. The sheer abundance of stone is the reason for its ubiquity and the mesmeric uniformity of the structures it now forms. So quietly proud and seemingly preordained are the villages of the Cotswolds, that it’s hard to imagine that it all began with the discreet amalgamation of infinitesimal morsels.