Skip to main content

No results found

Literature, Knowledge, Science, Eat, Sleep, Drink

Review: Food and Climate Change without the hot air

divider
Esther Lafferty
“You might not be happy to replace your morning toast and jam with margarine on bread, but could you forego a slice of Black Forest gateau? ”
food and climate change 3

Veganism and plant-based diets are on the increase as we try to do our bit to protect the planet with our daily food choices. It’s commonly understood that eating beef is worse for the environment than eating bread, but did you know that rice, traditionally grown in flooded fields, is responsible for two percent of all greenhouse gas emissions?

Using a standardised measure – the CO2 emissions for each ingredient – shown in simple colourful charts, in Food and Climate Change without the hot air, Sarah Bridle calculates the relative environmental costs that commonly-consumed meals have on the world, enabling the reader to make more informed decisions in their own kitchens. Would you be best opting for spaghetti bolognese, fish and chips or chicken tikka masala, for example? You might not be happy to replace your morning toast and jam with margarine on bread, but could you forego a slice of Black Forest gateau? This book offers informed choices about what to eat on a purely ecological basis to bring down your individual contribution to greenhouse gases, and even holds your coffee addiction up (favourably) against a transatlantic flight.

In easily-digestible chapters focusing on breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks too, Bridle follows the journey of every component from global farms and fields to kitchen prep with a glass of wine – asking also whether drinks other than tap water offer enough psychological benefits to justify their consequences for the environment. It’s a sobering thought.

Each section has detailed endnotes adding the underpinning science and contains a wealth of information to help you and whilst the facts and figures are frightening, this non-political analysis offers hope with tips to minimise food waste and ideas for the future. Not sure we’re ready for ground insect flour but who’s joining us for aquafaba (a chickpea-based egg substitute) pancakes?

Sarah Bridle: Food and Climate Change without the hot air (UIT Cambridge, Sept 2020)

Food and Climate Change without the hot air, Friday 16 October

RECOMMENDED

41r7JyWg ctijlr
Mon 11 Jan 2021

The Two Travellers

Optimism in 2021

Recently, I had the privilege to be in the company of a wise friend who told me a beautiful story. I would like to share that story with you and allow you to contemplate the meaning and wisdom of this tale.

Screenshot 2021 01 06 at 10.52.54 bczsk6
Thu 7 Jan 2021

Take a second to imagine a tall refreshing glass of water. Are you a half full or half empty sort of person?  Let’s start with the optimist, like the popular meme of the dog in the

QEs4wWGA zdyd6s
Tue 5 Jan 2021

Esther Lafferty looks ahead to a new year with optimism, and art that reminds us of the world’s beauty, and the ways we can address climate change.  Jericho artist Uniz Chuey’s latest

The Wonderful Wizard of OZ Creation Theatre
Tue 22 Dec 2020

Creation Theatre

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Award-winning site-responsive and leading digital theatre-makers Creation Theatre present a surreal and anarchic adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s classic.